HOME      KATE'S GLOBAL KITCHEN       SEARCH      COOKBOOK PROFILES    I LOVE DESSERTS      GLOBAL DESTINATIONS     SHOPPING     CONTACT


Recipe

 

Carving a Prime Rib

Be sure that the butcher has removed the chine bone properly so that the knife can slip between the bones. The strings, feather bones and fat cap are best removed in the kitchen.

Sit the rib with the cut side up and the bones to the left for a right handed carver. Cut parallel to the cut surface, about 3/8 inch per slice. Steady the rib with the fork between the top two ribs. A 12 to 14 inch roast beef knife, well sharpened, will allow you to make long smooth cuts. Draw the knife with the blade parallel to the table through the cut you want to make in a long smooth bowing stroke. Avoid sawing motions that create jagged edges. Cut the end cut even with the bone. Then cut one slice on the bone, one slice off the bone. This gives 16 cuts on a 7 rib standing rib roast. As you get down near the bottom you may want to use the flat of the fork to hold the meat still. This is the most difficult part and why you need a long sharp knife.

If you wish to cut English style, which means thin slices, you can remove and separate the bones in the kitchen by scoring each side, running a boning knife down the bone, and twisting it out. You can then lay the roast on the board, boned side down, and slice parallel to the eye. Start on the thicker rib end first. Carving this way is a real cinch. Before you start, use the edge of your knife to mark the center lightly. Then you can estimate the slices in the first half. Count as you go along, or put the dishes in two counted stacks in front of you. If you run a slice short, remember that you are serving yourself last. Historically, both men and women have carved at table, and guests were served in order of rank.

 

Steve's #10 Recipes:

Carving a Ham
Carving a Prime Rib
Carving a Turkey
Christmas Eggnog
Latkes, Potato Pancakes for Hanukkah
Yorkshire Pudding
 

©1996, Steve K. Holzinger. All rights reserved.

 

This Archived Page created between 1994 and 2001. Modified August 2007


The Global Gourmet
The Global Gourmet®
Main Page

 

Chinese New Year
Celebrate Chinese &
Lunar New Year

   Clip to Evernote

Bookmark and Share

 

Twitter: @KateHeyhoe

 
Search this site:

Advanced Search
Recent Searches


Departments

Kate's Global Kitchen
Kate's Books
Cookbook Profiles
Global Destinations
Holiday & Party Recipes
I Love Desserts
On Wine
Shopping

Caffeine and You Caffeine and You
cooking kids Cooking with Kids
new green basics New Green Basics

Archives
Conversions, Charts
   & Substitutions
Search

About the
Global Gourmet®
   Contact Info
   Advertising
   Feedback
   Privacy Statement

Recent Cookbooks

Cooking Italian
175 Home Recipes
4-Hour Chef
Bakery Cookbook
Barefoot Contessa
Bouchon Bakery
Burma: Rivers of Flavor
Cake Mix Doctor
Comfort Food
Craft of Coffee
Crazy Sexy Kitchen
Daily Cookie
Fifty Shades Chicken
French Slow Cooker
Frontera - Rick Bayless
Gluten-Free Quick & Easy
Jerusalem: A Cookbook
Kitchen Science
Lidia's Favorite Recipes
Make-Ahead and Freeze
Modern Milkshakes
Modernist Cuisine
Mystic Cookbook
Paleo Slow Cooking
Picky Palate
Pop Bakery
Practical Paleo
Quick Family Cookbook
Saltie
Sensational Cookies
Smitten Kitchen
Southern Living Recipes
Sweet Life in Paris
Trader Joe's Vegetarian
True Food
Whole Larder

More Cookbooks

 

Kitchen & Home
Markdowns

 
.

Copyright © 1994-2013,
Forkmedia LLC

 

 


cat toys Catnip Toys
 

Kitchen & Home
Markdowns

 
.