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Dear Readers,

Letters to the Editor welcomes your comments, questions, criticisms and suggestions. Looking for a specific recipe or trying to find a product? Please don't send those requests as a Letter to the Editor—we receive too many individual requests to reply to all of them here. Try our Message Boards or our Search page first.

If you would like to write a Letter to the Editor use our feedback form.

Note: To prevent spammers from automatically gathering email addresses off this page we have replaced the * symbol with an * (asterisk). To respond to someone, please replace the asterisk with the * symbol.

Thanks.

- The Editors

 

Questions & Comments

Dear Global Gourmet,

Thirty years ago I had a recipe for Lion's Head according to Joyce Chen's TV program. My daughter has asked me for the recipe and can I find it? No. Can you help?

Many thanks.

Emily Johnson
bhjepj*cais.com

 
Dear Emily,

When you need a recipe, do try the Global Gourmet's Search feature. We don't have Joyce Chen's version, but will master chef Martin Yan's version of Lion's Head do? These savory meatballs are nested in curly cabbage leaves, thus resembling a lion's head with shaggy mane. It's a traditional favorite and a festive dish, so I can understand why after 30 years, your daughter would still remember it.

You can find Martin Yan's Lion's Head meatballs at http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinations/china/lionhead.html.

Olives

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Dear Kate:

I happened upon your email address while trying to find a recipe and thought I would take a chance. A friend mentioned to me that she had recently had fried olives, a recipe she said came from Argentina. She asked if I knew about it...said I would check it out.

So, should you have a recipe for this, I would appreciate hearing from you.

Thanking you in advance

Earleen Bender
ebendr@[email-address-removed]

 
Dear Earleen,

I'm not sure about the Argentina version, but using the Search feature on our Global Gourmet site, I located two recipes from other countries for fried olives. Spain's Fried Olives can be found at http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinations/spain/folives.html and Italy's Cicchetti Olives, a popular little snack, is at /food/holiday/pageant/appetizers/cichetti.html Both are dredged in flour or breadcrumbs, then fried in oil. Yummy—although not likely on Dick Cheney's recommended diet!

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Hi,

I am in England.

I help run a museum in Leigh-on-Sea in Essex and we are raising money to restore a Victorian fisherman's cottage to be part of the museum.

To raise funds we are putting together a recipe book where all the recipes include plums because the cottage is called Plumbs Cottage.

I have found a recipe on your site for Pheasant with olives and fresh plums and wonder if it would be possible to include it in our book. Can you please advise. We will of course print an accreditation.

Many thanks,

Carole Pavitt
almtree*northdell.demon.co.uk

 
Dear Carol,

Thanks for the inquiry. That recipe is under copyright by John Manikowsky, and it appeared in his book Wild Fish and Game, published by Artisan Press in 1997. You would have to contact the author and publisher for recipe reprint rights. Artisan is based in New York City.

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Hello,

I heard that after using an oven, its door should be left open so the oven can cool--otherwise the oven's thermostat will get messed up. I wonder if there is anything to that. Should the oven door be left open?

Yours,

Paul Tracy
PTracy9@[email-address-removed]

 
Dear Paul,

I've never heard of leaving an oven door open to protect the thermostat, and with the technology behind today's ovens, I doubt that's the case. If you're still unsure, I suggest you check with your oven's manufacturer.

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Could you please tell me if rice wine vinegar and rice vinegar are one and the same?

Thank You.

George Geoffroy
geogeo*sympatico.ca

 
Dear George,

For all practical purposes today, yes.

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Hello,

My name is Dorie. I have been on AOL for over 7 years and you used to have an Easter Egg hunt for AOL. Last year I couldn't find it. I was wondering if you still have the egg hunt. I really enjoyed looking for the eggs in the different sites on AOL. Please e-mail me and let me know.

Egg

Thank you.

Dorie
LucyCoe2@[email-address-removed]

---

Hello,

I just got back into AOL and was wondering if you were going to be doing the Easter Egg hunt again this year? Or did they discontinue that altogether ? I sure hope not as I really used to love that part of being on AOL. I love being introduced to new sites that I would not ordinarily find by myself.

This is a great way to find the new sites and maybe even win a prize. So, if you no longer run it, please reconsider doing it again this year.

Otherwise, please send me email letting me know when it is starting. I love it so much. Thanks.

gabybear37@[email-address-removed]

---

Hello,

I wrote a few days ago to ask if they were going to run the Easter Egg Hunt this year and have not yet received an answer. Could someone please let me know if it will be running this year. I recently just got back on AOL and I loved it when I did the hunts before. I hope they do it this year.

PLEASE, PLEASE!!!

gabybear37@[email-address-removed]

 
Dear Readers,

The Annual Easter eGG Hunt, which ran for four years, was indeed loads of fun for us as well. Sadly, we had to discontinue it...To create a really great user experience using a wide range of quality sites, the eGG Hunt requires more resources than we can allocate. We've received many letters from fans asking us to bring it back, and while we can't do so this year, perhaps we'll take a 'crack' at it and 'resurrect' the eGG Hunt in a future Easter season. (By the way, we started the Hunt as a natural outgrowth of our corporate name and original site: eGG—which stands for "electronic Gourmet Guide."

Have a happy Easter,

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Hi from Sweden!

I moved from the U.S. in Nevada to Sweden a few months ago.

The food here is very different and the cooking methods (I've learned) are also different. In Nevada, I've never had a problem with peeling a boiled egg but now can't get it to peel without taking the hole egg with it. I needed deviled eggs for a party and was having trouble so I got online and found your website.

I tried your method for hard boiled eggs and they came out perfect. By the way, I think the eggs in Nevada are not as fresh, of course, as it's so far from most fresh food sources.

Thank you very much. I'll be visiting your site again I'm sure.

Allen Price
a_l_price*hotmail.com
Landskrona Sweden

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Nice recipes. I don't eat meat but I do cook it for my family and I am sure they would love your recipes. Keep up the great work.

Sheila Brown
AsetTuTAnkh9@[email-address-removed]
Egyptian Book and Gift Shop
Washington DC

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Dear Global Gourmet,

I have just finished viewing your site and found it quite enjoyable. I found the content to be very valuable.

Thank you.

Eva Prevost
French Culinary Institute
New York, NY

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Dear Global Gourmet,

I just visited your website today for the first time and I love it. Very versatile and great info and recipes. I'll look forward to continuing to visit it...

Regina
Regnatwin2@[email-address-removed]

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Your excellent site was forwarded to me by a friend in Austria. Still to this day it continues to be a source of research, and a wealth of informative gourmet culinary delights.

Thank you.

William Hoff
behoff114@[email-address-removed]
Hot Springs AR

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Just finished reading the first 2 installments (and lacerating my aesthetic sensibilities with the "before" pictures) of your remodeling series.

Great writing! (A compliment that I give MIGHTY begrudgingly, I might add.)

Monte Montgomery
bestcat*mediaone.net

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Just a comment on kitchen countertops. I have a dark green slate countertop. When we went to the stone vendor to pick the slabs, there was a lot of choice. Many of the slate slabs had extensive veining. I wanted a quiet countertop, however, so picked slabs with little veining but which had occasional tiny sea shell fossils. Admittedly the slate was expensive (on the order of granite), but it is quite beautiful and extremely functional. And a wonderful surface on which to roll out biscuits, scones, or pastry.

Judith Liebman
jliebman*uiuc.edu

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Dear Global Gourmet,

Tried to access your Oisobagi step by step directions, but was told I was unable to. Is the page still available?

Thanks.

Gayle1639*cs.com

 
Dear Gayle,

It's available in two places, both older archived pages:

/food/recipes/kimchi.html

/food/egg/egg0497/kimchi.html

We just tried both pages and they work fine. How did you find them? Perhaps some other site had a bad link to them?

Thanks.

Kate Heyhoe
The Global Gourmet

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Dear Global Gourmet,

My comments have to do with this March's Gourmet Guess.

The question having to do with the boiling point of water in Denver, CO lists four choices. None of these choices is correct according to the following information. How do I choose an answer that would be correct?

"If the pressure on a liquid is reduced, the b.p. is lowered. At higher elevations, where air pressure is less, water boils below 100 C. In Denver, Colorado, which is 1.6 km (1 mi) above sea level, the b.p. Of water averages 94 degrees C (201 degrees F). When the pressure on a sample of water falls to 4.55 torr (0.088 lb/sq in), boiling occurs at 0 degrees C (32 degrees F), which is the normal freezing point."

"Boiling Point," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2000

Where did you get your information?

Olivia Ashcraft
BigO56@[email-address-removed]
Chula Vista CA

 
Dear Olivia,

According to Howard Hillman, author of Kitchen Science and more than 25 other cooking-related books, and corroborated by the Encyclopedia Britannica, the boiling point of water drops by approximately 2 degrees Fahrenheit (or 1 degree Celsius) for each 1000 feet of elevation. All you have to do is determine the altitude of Denver in feet to determine the approximate boiling point there. The key word here is "approximate," especially since Denver is not all at one altitude.

Given all this, there is only one answer in the four *choices* available in Gourmet Guess that is correct within the range of Denver's altitude. Thousands of contest entrants have already selected the correct answer. The figure Microsoft specifically cites is the farthest away from any other reference we have found, especially since they use the word "averages" in their definition. But they aren't completely wrong either, since the formula is approximate.

Thanks for playing Gourmet Guess.

The Global Gourmet

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Dear Global Gourmet,

I can't believe I finally won, I've been playing for over 4 years! Exciting news, thanks.

Jennifer Panning
jenreno*hotmail.com
Chicago IL

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Dear Global Gourmet,

I look forward to receiving my prize. Thanks for having the Gourmet Guess. I look forward to playing it every month and testing my knowledge.

Thanks,

Cheryl Gray
clg815*excite.com
New York, NY

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This page created April 2001


 

 
 

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