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Blueberry Pie

(or Blackberry, Boysenberry, Loganberry, or Raspberry Pie)

blueberry pie  

Pastry for 9-inch Two-Crust Pie

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 6 cups fresh blueberries (See note about frozen berries)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice (I've yet to put this in, but it calls for it)
  • 1 tablespoon margarine or butter (Again, I've never used this)

Pastry for 10-inch Two-Crust Pie

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 8 cups fresh blueberries
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons margarine or butter

Heat oven to 425. Prepare pastry. Mix sugar, flour, and cinnamon in large bowl. Stir in blueberries. Turn into pastry-lined pie plate. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Dot with margarine. Cover with top crust that has slits cut in it; seal and flute. Cover edge with 2- to 3-inch strip of aluminum foil to prevent browning. Remove exess foil during last 15 minutes of baking.Bake 35 to 45 minutes or until crust is brown and juice begins to bubble through slits in crust. 8 servings; 395 calories each for 9-inch pie, 590 calories each for 10-inch pie.

Blackberry, Boysenberry, Loganberry, or Raspberry Pie: Prepare 9-inch pie as directed--except increase sugar to 1 cup. Substitute fresh berries for the blueberries. Omit lemon juice. 415 calories per serving.

If you are using frozen berries, home freezing works best. Commercial frozen berries just don't cut it. If you freeze at home, measure out six cups of berries (enough for one pie). If used within six months, it's almost hard to tell the difference between fresh and frozen.

 
The Top 10 Ways to
Celebrate National Pie Day
  • Eat pie. Whether you make it yourself or buy it at a supermarket or bakery or order it at a restaurant, eat some pie on National Pie Day. Pie is great as breakfast, with lunch or dinner or as a late-night snack.
  • Make pie. Bake a homemade pie on National Pie Day. Pie is meant to be shared so serve it to friends and family.
  • Teach pie-making. Stage classes and demonstrations and samplings at stores and schools. Invite seniors who know pie to teach a class. If you don't know how to make pie, attend a pie-making class or demonstration.
  • Hold a pie night. Gather family and friends for a pie celebration. Everyone must bring one homemade pie for the pie buffet.
  • Hold a pie-making contest. Invite the best pie-makers to compete for prizes in various categories.
  • Hold a charity pie-throwing, pie-eating contest or pie auction. We suggest you donate the proceeds to the local food bank.
  • Hold a pie sale and sampling. An excellent opportunity for pie retailers and commercial bakers to introduce consumers to pie through special National Pie day sales and promotions. Bakeries can also donate pies to a pie raffle or pie auction. Restaurants can offer a pie sampler plate or free pie with dinner on January 23.
  • Stage kid's pie activities including pie poetry and poster contests. Show classes how to make pie and then serve it at lunch, preferably a la mode. Teach Ameican history and nutrition through pie. Let kids make pies of their own.
  • Pass along pie memories. Talk about your favorite pies and the family history behind them. Publish pie memories and recipes in your local newspaper.
  • Eat pie. You can always have another slice, preferably warm and a la mode. And be sure to say "Pie!" to everyone you meet.

For more information, contact the American Pie Council, the only national organization devoted to eating, making, selling, promoting and enjoying pie.

This page originally published as a FoodDay article in 1997.

Copyright © 2007, Forkmedia LLC. All rights reserved.

 
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This page modified February 2007


 


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