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Foodday

 

About Salmon
and a Seared Norwegian Salmon Recipe

Trotter  

The luxury of fresh Atlantic salmon available year round is still relatively new for many professional chefs. The Norwegian Salmon Marketing Council has worked with great chefs from around the world to explore new ways to prepare our salmon. One of those talents is Charlie Trotter, the energetic, young chef and owner of the Chicago restaurant bearing his name. The challenging recipe Charlie presents here displays his trademark innovation and skillful blending of fresh flavors.

"Freshness is important. Because Norwegian salmon is so versatile, fresh and good all year round, you only need to think about the season when you're using it. See what vegetables and flavors are fresh and work them into the scene. Always keep in mind what's appropriate for the time of year."

   —Charlie Trotter

 
Cooking salmon for the seasons

Available fresh every day of the year, Norway's salmon is delicious with a range of ingredients-from the crisp greens and vegetables of spring and summer to winter's hearty grains. It can be prepared almost any way; grilled, raw, cured, baked or seared, few ingredients weather the seasons as well as Norwegian salmon.

To keep your salmon fresh

Freshness is paramount no matter what season your are cooking for. To make sure your Norwegian salmon stays fresh, here are some tips for storage.

Temperature-Store the whole, clean fish on ice in the refrigerator. Drain frequently and replace melted ice. Never place the salmon flesh directly on ice-wrap steaks and fillets individually in plastic or paper to keep them from contact with ice or water.

Shelf life-Norwegian salmon should stay fresh for as long as five days when it is cared for and refrigerated properly.

Freezing-Freeze the whole, clean salmon with the head and skin on. This protects the fish from freezer burn and oxidation. Wrap and freeze steaks and fillets individually. Use within two months.

Seared Salmon  

"Grains give you winteriness and hominess. Quinoa also has an Asian flavor that's unexpected. The salmon's seared black but still slightly rare on the inside. Rich, but not heavy."

 

Seared Norwegian Salmon

Ingredients
  • 1 lb (450 gr) Norwegian salmon
  • 2 lotus root
  • 12 oz. (325 gr) quinoa
  • 8 oz (225 gr) napa cabbage (chiffonade cut)
  • 4 oz (100 gr) preserved ginger (small dice)
  • 4 oz (100 gr) seaweed
  • 4 oz (1 dl) soy
  • 4 oz (1 dl) orange juice
  • 4 oz (100 gr) black sesame seeds
  • 8 oz (225 gr) jicama
  • 4 oz (100 gr) radish sprouts
  • 8 oz (225 gr) water chestnuts (julienned)
  • 40 pcs. haricot verts
  • 4 oz (100 gr) parsley
To prepare lotus root cups:
Slice lotus root on a mandolin tissue paper thin. Line a potato basket with lotus root and place another potato basket on top to help keep the shape. Fry at 350 degrees F (180 degrees Celsius) until golden brown.
To prepare quinoa:
Steam quinoa and add sautéed napa cabbage, ginger, seaweed, soy and orange juice. Season to taste.
To assemble:

Sauté medallions of salmon which have been pressed in sesame seeds, (3 pcs. per person) until medium rare. Heat remaining by steaming, season. On a plate (center) place the lotus root cup which has been filled with quinoa. Place the haricot vert (3) in three spots around the plate. Place the salmon in 3 alternating spots. Place the jicama and and water chestnuts, that have been tossed in chopped herbs, around the plate.

 

Provided by Norwegian Salmon Marketing Council

This page originally published as a FoodDay article in 1997.

Copyright © 2007, Forkmedia LLC. All rights reserved.

 
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This page modified January 2007


 


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