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the appetizer:

The Yogurt Bible by Pat Crocker includes excerpts and recipes like Cooking with Yogurt; Chocolate Yogurt; Tzatziki; Fruit-Bottom Yogurt; and Lamb Tagine with Plums and Apricots.

Cookbook

 

Fruit-Bottom Yogurt

Makes 4 cups (1 L)

 

Using homemade fruit preserves with homemade yogurt makes good sense but, if you don't have homemade preserves, use commercial jams, jellies or preserves. The results are almost as good. If the preserves have been stored in the refrigerator, be sure to let them come to room temperature before use. If the preserves are cold when the warm milk is added, it will take longer for the bacteria to do their work.

Tips
  • Use strawberry, raspberry, cherry, blueberry, peach, apricot or other fruit preserves in this recipe.
  • For diabetics, use artificially sweetened fruit preserves and omit the honey.
  • Food thermometer
  • Electric yogurt maker
  • 4 cups 1% or 2% milk — 1 L
  • 1/3 cup instant skim milk powder — 75 mL
  • 2 to 4 tbsp honey (see Tips above) — 30 to 60 mL
  • 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract — 15 mL
  • 1/2 cup fruit preserves (see Tips) — 125 mL
  • 3 tbsp organic live-culture yogurt — 45 mL
         or 5 g freeze-dried yogurt culture

1. In a stainless-steel saucepan, heat milk to the scalding point (see Tips, page 24) over medium-low heat, stirring frequently. Add skim milk powder and stir well. Remove from heat and let cool to 110 degrees to 120 degrees F (43 degrees to 49 degrees C), stirring often. Stir in honey and vanilla. Cooling could take up to 1 hour.

2. Meanwhile, divide fruit preserves evenly and spoon into bottom of each yogurt cup. Set aside until milk is ready.

3. In a bowl, combine starter yogurt or freeze-dried yogurt culture with about 1/2 cup (125 mL) of the cooled milk. Add to remaining cooled milk and stir well to distribute yogurt culture.

4. Pour into prepared cups, secure lids if suggested by manufacturer, and place in yogurt maker. Set the time for 8 to 12 hours or minimum time recommended in manufacturer's instructions. The longer yogurt ferments, the firmer and more tart it will be.

5. Do not disturb the liquid as it is fermenting. Check one container after 8 hours and, if yogurt has reached the desired consistency, remove cups from yogurt maker, secure lids, if necessary, and refrigerate immediately. If it is not set to your liking, replace test cup and continue to ferment for another 1 to 2 hours, or until desired consistency is reached. Refrigeration stops the fermentation process. Let yogurt chill completely before serving or using in recipes.

 
  • from:
    The Yogurt Bible
  • by Pat Crocker
  • Robert Rose 2010
  • 320 pages; Over 200 recipes; 24.95 US; 27.95 CAN; 16.95 UK
  • ISBN-10: 0778802558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-7788-0255-6
  • Reprinted by permission.

Buy The Yogurt Bible

 

The Yogurt Bible

 
 
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This page created March 2011


 


 
 

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